Tiffany Tang

jimenezA native Californian, Tiffany knew she wanted to be a writer when she found herself happily volunteering to diagram sentences in her junior high English class. Deciding then, at 13, that she would be an English major in college, she accomplished her goal at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts. Her literary studies also took her to England for a year abroad, where she earned a diploma in English and American Literature. Detouring for a bit after graduation to pursue other artistic endeavors, Tiffany received an MFA from the Actors Studio Drama School in New York, but her love of writing never left her. While acting, she has also worked as a newspaper journalist, a speechwriter, and a business writing teacher. She continues to write personal essays, rehearsal blogs, plays, and screenplays, and has recently begun to dabble in the world of fiction.


What the Day Holds

(287 words without title)

Something was different today.

Sam had clipped the leashes on his two German Shepherds and walked them, as he did everyday at 4 pm, around the corner of his suburban Los Angeles neighborhood towards the perfectly landscaped dog park. Typically, they would trot vigorously at his side, and he would have patience as they explored the extraneous brush lining the manicured walkways. But, not today. Today, they were hesitant, their gait tentative. Sam tried to coax them towards the park, unsettled by the way their ears remained attentive, their eyes searching. He looked around. The sun was a little hotter, the light was a little whiter, the wind was…still. Silent. No birds. No faraway dogs barking. No movement in the air.

And then…he heard it.

The slow, distant rumble seemed to originate behind the hills which sat on the perimeter of Sam’s neighborhood. As it approached, it grew louder, thunderous, deafening. The dogs whimpered, tugged against their leashes, ready to bolt from the unseen predator.

“What the…”

And then, it was upon them. The ground shook and moved beneath them. The trees bucked and yawned as their roots unearthed themselves from their moorings. From all around, Sam could hear the sound of glass shattering, wood splintering, concrete splitting. He gathered up the leashes and headed for the only safe space he could think of: the middle of the street. From there, he and the dogs watched as the world fell apart around them.

It was the biggest earthquake California had seen in over 50 years.

Protected by the open air, they rode out the storm. When the ground stopped trembling, Sam took a long look at his dogs.

“Well, guys.  How do you feel about New Jersey?”

 


Manhood

(298 words without title)

The shark twitched ferociously on the deck of the ship.

Emma thought she might be sick. But she couldn’t leave, couldn’t move. She stared at the shark, fighting for the sea, fighting for life. Finally, she looked out over the crowd of crewmen that had gathered on deck.

“We are men!” Emma yelled in her deepest, strongest voice to the bodies gathered around her. “We are the rulers of the sea!”

Her pronouncement elicited some loud grunts that seemed somewhat favorable. Good start? she wondered.

Emma pulled her knife from the waistband of her work trousers and raised it over her head.

“We of the Intrepid send a warning to the creatures of the oceans! You will bow before Captain McNeil and the fierce crewmen who serve him!

More grunts, some appreciative yells. Are they actually buying this? Emma thought.

Emma looked at the shark again, almost dead now. She had to put it out of its misery. She whispered a silent prayer of gratitude for its life, now ending so senselessly, before bringing her knife down into its neck.

The shark jerked violently. The crowd roared. Emma held on with all of her strength and plunged the blade deeper until finally, at last, the great beast was still.

There was blood on her hands, on her knife. She thought about what a macho crewman would do. She stood, and thrust the bloody knife into the air.

INTREPID!” She yelled into the heavens.

The crew yelled with her, now giddy from the cathartic scene. Soon, she was carried off, soaring over the crowd in triumph, hands uplifting, raising her to the sky.

Hopefully, Emma thought to herself, this would be enough to convince them. If they found out she was a woman, she would most certainly be dead.


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